How to Prevent Falls at Home

How to Prevent Falls at Home


Falls present a serious health risk to older adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falling is the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries among older adults. The good news is there are simple ways you can prevent most falls—especially in your home.


Your home is a common source of falls due to hazards that are often overlooked, but easy to fix. Use the list on this page to help reduce your risk for falls at home. 


Floors

  • Make sure you have a clear path and don’t have to walk around furniture when walking through a room
  • Use heavy-duty, double-sided tape to prevent throw rugs from moving
  • Keep objects like papers, books, pillows, and boxes off the floor
  • Tape cords and wires next to the wall so you can’t trip over them

Kitchen

  • Move items you use often to lower shelves
  • Use a step stool that has a bar to hold on to

Bedrooms

  • Place a lamp close to the bed where it’s easy to reach

Bathrooms

  • Put a non-slip rubber mat on the floor of the tub or shower
  • Install grab bars inside the tub and next to the toilet
  • Use a night light

Stairs and Steps

  • Keep stairs and steps free of objects and clutter
  • Fix any uneven or loose steps
  • Make sure there is a light over the stairway
  • Make sure any carpet on the stairs is firmly attached to every step
  • Use the hand rail when using the stairs

What to Do if You Fall


Get Immediate Medical Attention
Even if you do not have an obvious injury, if you have any loss of consciousness or any sign of confusion after falling, seek immediate medical attention.


Notify Your Primary Care Physician (PCP)
Even if you have no injury, make an appointment with your PCP. Your fall could be related to a medical problem, and a falls evaluation will be needed to find the cause and help prevent another fall.

Preventing Falls
According to the National Institute on Aging, more than one in three people age 65 years or older falls each year. But, in addition to fall-proofing your home, there are steps you can take to reduce your chances of falling.  


Also, for further resources related to falls and falls prevention, visit the National Institute on Aging (NIA).